President Trump banks on base

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Bipartisanship rejected in response to turmoil

JONATHAN LEMIRE and KEN THOMAS

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is banking on his loyal base of supporters to help him through the tangle of the Russia turmoil. Trump had his core backers in mind as he responded to former FBI Director James Comey’s blockbuster Senate testimony and the steady creep of multiple congressional investigations and Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s probe.

Trump’s Republican allies might have found Comey credible, but the president called the man he fired as FBI director a liar and a “leaker.”

Trump said he was the victim of the “fake news” media. And he tried to charge ahead by resorting to what worked for him as a candidate — pushing policies dear to his base and using strong rhetoric to convey that message.

“As you know, we’re under siege, you understand that. But we will come out bigger and better and stronger than ever. You watch,” Trump said Thursday as Comey was telling senators that the president had pressured him to drop an investigation into an ex-White House aide.

His strategy is consistent with the way Trump has governed in his first four months in office. His White House has made little effort to broaden the bedrock of support for a president who lost the popular vote and receives scant backing from Democrats.

Trump has yet to hold a rally in a state he lost to Hillary Clinton in November.

He visits many of the small Rust Belt cities and rural heartland communities that went for him.

While backing away from some campaign promises, Trump has made good on policies his loyalists track closely.

When Trump pulled the United States from the Paris climate accords despite pleas from American allies, he framed it as a victory for American industry and the blue-collar workers who backed him.

He appointed a conservative to the Supreme Court, Neil Gorsuch, and is steadily nominating similar candidates to fill judicial vacancies.

With help from the Republican- led Congress, he has rolled back Obama-era rules on the environment, gun rights, the internet and financial regulations.

Support for the president has broken down sharply along party lines.

Only 4 percent of Democrats back Trump while he has an 81 percent approval rating among Republicans, according to a Quinnipiac poll released this past week.

His overall job approval number has fallen to the mid-30s, a new low, but the GOP number has remained steady in the past two months.

Even if Trump’s core holds, the erosion of support from independents and wavering Democrats would jeopardize his ability to build support in swing states such as Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Florida, said Paul Maslin, a Democratic pollster based in Wisconsin.

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Steve King
Steve lives in Fulton with his wife and one son. In 2010, he graduated from Eastern New Mexico University . Now, he writes software and gadget reviews and sport news for the team. During his free time, Steve coaches baseball to junior high school boys.

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